Published Articles

The Effect of Market Orientation on Learning, Innovativeness, and Performance in Primary Agriculture

Market awareness and innovativeness are important resources in any business environment. As customer needs and competitor responses change, performance may depend on the ability for firms to recognize and react to market shifts. Using survey data from beef farmers in Illinois, we examine the role market orientation, organizational learning, and innovativeness play on satisfaction with performance. We use a structural equation model to find that market-oriented and innovative firms are more satisfied with their performance while controlling for structural and demographic variables. Results also show that while market-oriented firms are more innovative, human capital resources moderate the ability to exploit innovations. We also find that an increase in experience correlates with less organizational learning.

You can find the article here.

Market driven innovation and entrepreneurial behaviour: The strategic value of a market orientation in primary agriculture

This paper examines the strategic value of a market orientation using concepts from the resource based view of the firm. We show that a market orientation can be a strategic resource as it is heterogeneous, imperfectly mobile, and is imperfectly substitutable. Using examples from both small-scale and large-scale production agriculture, we show how a market orientation can contribute to the awareness and implementation of new processes to improve performance. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of market orientation and firm strategy, along with a discussion of managerial implications and calls for future research.

You can find the article here.

Market orientation and firm performance across value disciplines in the Illinois beef sector

Previous research studies have suggested market oriented firms achieve superior performance relative to their peers (Narver and Slater, 1990). Furthermore, researchers have suggested that firms that can clearly define their value discipline will also benefit. Recent studies have shown that highly market oriented and innovative firms are able to define more clearly their chosen value discipline. This study extends that research by examining firm performance across value disciplines. Using a sample of Illinois beef producers, we find that levels of market orientation and performance are not equal across value disciplines. Our results show the level of market orientation is lowest for firms with an operational excellence value discipline and highest for a customer intimacy/product leadership value discipline. Furthermore, our findings show that firms with high market orientation scores outperform firms with low market orientation scores regardless of degree of value discipline clarity.

You can find the article here.

The value of a positional advantage for agricultural SMEs

Marketing and strategy scholars have established the importance of a market orientation and innovativeness as drivers of firm performance. This study examines how a market orientation, innovativeness, entrepreneurship, organizational learning, and a cost focus contribute to a positional advantage within the context of agricultural SMEs.

Using a sample of 307 Illinois beef farmers, we empirically measure and test the construct of positional advantage and examine the relationship between positional advantage and firm performance. Our results indicate that market orientation, entrepreneurship, innovativeness, organizational learning and a cost focus are first-order indicators of positional advantage and that organizational learning, market orientation, and experience are positively related to firm performance.

You can find the article here.

Market orientation and firm performance across value disciplines in the Illinois beef sector

Previous research studies have suggested market oriented firms achieve superior performance relative to their peers (Narver and Slater, 1990). Furthermore, researchers have suggested that firms that can clearly define their value discipline will also benefit. Recent studies have shown that highly market oriented and innovative firms are able to define more clearly their chosen value discipline. This study extends that research by examining firm performance across value disciplines. Using a sample of Illinois beef producers, we find that levels of market orientation and performance are not equal across value disciplines. Our results show the level of market orientation is lowest for firms with an operational excellence value discipline and highest for a customer intimacy/product leadership value discipline. Furthermore, our findings show that firms with high market orientation scores outperform firms with low market orientation scores regardless of degree of value discipline clarity.

You can find the article here.

The moderating effects of trust and commitment on market orientation, value discipline clarity, and firm performance

It has been suggested that market-oriented firms are able to clearly define how they provide value to consumers (Narver, Slater, & Tietje,1998; Treacy & Wiersema, 1993). Utilizing a sample of Illinois beef producers, the authors empirically examine the market orientation–clarity–performance link. Results indicate that trust and commitment positively influence market orientation and organizational learning within the firm. Value discipline clarity is shown to have little effect on firm performance, whereas market orientation and organizational learning are shown to be significant contributors to firm performance. Trust and commitment are shown to moderate the linkage between learning and firm performance.

You can find the article here.

Do Market Oriented Firms Demonstrate Clarity on Their Value Discipline?  Evidence from Illinois Beef Producers

A market orientation has been shown to lead to improved firm performance in a variety of industries (Narver and Slater, 1990; Deshpande et al., 1993). In previous research, it has been argued that performance benefits are a result of a greater awareness of the sources of value the product provides to the consumer, without specifically describing how value was created. Treacy and Wiersema (1993) developed the concept of value disciplines, which are three distinctive means of value provision, namely operational excellence, customer intimacy and product leadership. More recently, Narver et al. (1998) argued that market oriented firms have a clear understanding of how they provide value to customers, but this assertion has yet to be empirically tested. A new scale was developed and tested to measure the choice and clarity of value discipline. Using a sample of 343 Illinois beef producers, results show that organizational learning, innovativeness, and extreme levels of market orientation contribute to value discipline clarity while moderate levels of market orientation have the opposite effect.

You can find the article here.

Market Orientation, Innovation and Entrepreneurship: An Empirical Examination of the Illinois Beef Industry

This paper explores the importance of a producer’s market orientation on their subjective performance within agricultural commodity markets. Using a structural equation model of beef producers, our findings suggest that market oriented firms are highly innovative and achieve superior performance. These findings are consistent with previous research on the market orientation-performance relationship in heterogeneous product markets. The cost focus of a firm was also found to have a significant influence on innovation, but no direct effect on performance. This suggests that beef producers should follow a balanced approach utilizing both an external market and an internal productivity focus to achieve
superior returns as opposed to solely focusing on internal productivity as many producers currently do.

You can find the article here.

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